Ferrari has played down the significance of Mercedes' performance in Sunday's Spanish Grand Prix.

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Mercedes' most competitive race of the season so far was last weekend in Barcelona, thanks to a variety of upgrades.

George Russell finished third for his second podium of the season, while Lewis Hamilton came in fifth after a first-lap puncture sent him nearly to the back.

The W13's performance caused Mercedes team chief Toto Wolff to declare that the team had the fastest race vehicle on Sunday and that the team's confidence in its ability to win the championship this year had been revived.

However, Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto claims that Mercedes' competitive performance must be viewed in context, and that the German carmaker is still no faster than the Maranello outfit was in 2021.

"I believe congrats first to them, since they recovered and improved the speed of their car," Binotto told Sky.

"They were seven tenths off the pace in the qualifying lap, which is still a short circuit." They finished 30 seconds or more behind Red Bull, and Charles [Leclerc] could have been 40 seconds behind them.

"Forty seconds is still six, seven tenths a lap over 66 laps." Six or seven tenths of a second every lap is still substantial. Last year, it was Ferrari."

Ferrari Team Principal Mattia Binotto Alexander Trienitz took the photo.

While Binotto isn't getting too excited about Mercedes' current position, Red Bull is aware of the Brackley-based team's potential.

Following seeing how quickly Red Bull was able to return to the top of the championship standings after some early season issues, Mercedes team leader Christian Horner believes Mercedes has a potential to achieve the same.

"I think it illustrates how rapidly things can swing," Horner remarked of the turnaround between Red Bull and Ferrari.

"I believe we were 40 points behind after Australia and led by six points heading into Monaco a few races later." So it just goes to show how rapidly things can change in Formula 1.

"That's why, with so many points still available, I wouldn't write Mercedes off." We all know Ferrari has a fast automobile. As a result, you should be aware that things might change very quickly."




Lewis Hamilton said he was not defeatist after fighting back from the back of the grid to finish fifth in the Spanish Grand Prix.
Lewis Hamilton said he was not defeatist after fighting back from the back of the grid to finish fifth in the Spanish Grand Prix.

Hamilton radioed Mercedes engineer Pete Bonnington shortly after returning to the track in 19th place to recommend that the team spare the engine on his vehicle.
Bonnington told Hamilton that the team's predictions suggested an eighth-place result or better was conceivable, therefore they should keep going.
I was thinking, "Why don't we just save the engine and fight another day?"
"It's been challenging all around since the last race of the year," Hamilton remarked.
It seemed a lot like some of the previous days, older races that I've done, to start the race today positive and then have that trouble [at the start], but then to come back.

Aston Martin's upgraded AMR22 endured a tough start to life at the Spanish Grand Prix, the team coming home without points for the fourth time in six races this year
Aston Martin's upgraded AMR22 endured a tough start to life at the Spanish Grand Prix, the team coming home without points for the fourth time in six races this year

The upgraded Aston Martin AMR22 had a difficult start to life at the Spanish Grand Prix, with the team finishing without points for the fourth time in six races this season after both drivers failed to qualify.
Vettel was given a challenging two-stop strategy by the team, with the German going the longest on the soft compound tyre in the first stint of the race.
Vettel climbed into the top ten, but he couldn't maintain his position once his strategy was exhausted, and he finished 11th.
"In the end, I don't think it made a significant difference."
"It was a difficult race," the Canadian stated, "albeit it was basically concluded by my collision with Pierre when I overtook him."

Formula 1 boss Ross Brawn insists Lewis Hamilton has no intention of retiring
Formula 1 boss Ross Brawn insists Lewis Hamilton has no intention of retiring

Ross Brawn, the managing director of Formula One, does not believe Lewis Hamilton, the seven-time World Champion, is considering retirement.
However, a poor performance from his Mercedes W13 during the first six rounds has put him out of contention for the championship, with the Briton currently ranked P6 in the standings.
Brawn, on the other hand, feels Hamilton is still focused on winning his seventh championship, which would put him above of Michael Schumacher.
I'm very sure he wants to win his seventh championship, if not this year, then next year, as seems inevitable.
"That's the message I'm getting from the team, whereas George is taking a more traditional route...
and Lewis is attempting to address the issue.

Traffic problems at the Spanish Grand Prix
Traffic problems at the Spanish Grand Prix

Formula One has encouraged officials at the Spanish Grand Prix to resolve major traffic issues that emerged over the weekend in Barcelona.
The race was nearly sold out over the weekend, with over 120,000 spectators flocking to the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya for the Spanish Grand Prix on Sunday.
This caused major traffic congestion as fans attempted to leave the circuit, while the neighbouring Montmelo train station experienced an unexpectedly large number of passengers, causing considerable delays in returning to Barcelona city centre.
"The massive number of supporters at this event both inside and outside the circuit generated traffic concerns for the fans," Formula 1 said in a statement.
The popularity of the Spanish Grand Prix has grown in recent seasons, with the devoted 'Orange Army' of Max Verstappen followers slowly increasing in Barcelona year after year, along with the appeal of having two home heroes in Fernando Alonso and Carlos Sainz.

Formula One's Monaco Grand Prix is at risk of being axed from the calendar, reports say
Formula One's Monaco Grand Prix is at risk of being axed from the calendar, reports say

According to reports, Formula One's prestigious race in Monaco is in danger of being dropped off the schedule, amid concerns that the event has starting to lose its lustre.
The Sun reports that the sport may have outgrown the circuit.
The scenario is made even more perplexing by the fact that Monaco does not pay F1 any fees for the right to conduct a race on a yearly basis.
Because the season is now limited to only 24 races, it is possible that the famed harbourside motor race will be dropped from the schedule.
According to the Sun, F1 wanted to keep the race despite the deteriorated circuit since contracts were typically settled upon over dinner in the principality.